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Anne of Green Gables Series, Book 1
Cover of Anne of Green Gables Series, Book 1
Anne of Green Gables Series, Book 1
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"The books I read most as a child were Lucy Maud Montgomery." -Madeleine L'Engle

An unforgettable character beloved by generations of readers

Redheaded orphan Anne Shirley longs for a real home, somewhere she can truly belong. When she first arrives at the Green Gables house on Prince Edward Island, it's everything she ever imagined. But to stay, she'll first have to convince Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert to adopt her. And that means controlling her temper (even when Gilbert Blythe calls her "Carrots"), staying out of trouble (and away from hair dye), and not getting too carried away with her daydreams (though she would make the perfect Lady of Shallot floating down the river). Anne might not always get it quite right, but she does keep things interesting...

Through Anne's eyes, the ordinary world becomes magical and every day is an adventure. She inspires the dreamer in all of us, never hesitates to say the things we wish we could get away with, and makes us cherish every kindred spirit we meet. It's no surprise Anne is loved around the world by generations of readers.

This new edition lovingly restores the original, unabridged text and includes an all-new, exclusive introduction with special memories from L.M. Montgomery's granddaughter.

"The books I read most as a child were Lucy Maud Montgomery." -Madeleine L'Engle

An unforgettable character beloved by generations of readers

Redheaded orphan Anne Shirley longs for a real home, somewhere she can truly belong. When she first arrives at the Green Gables house on Prince Edward Island, it's everything she ever imagined. But to stay, she'll first have to convince Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert to adopt her. And that means controlling her temper (even when Gilbert Blythe calls her "Carrots"), staying out of trouble (and away from hair dye), and not getting too carried away with her daydreams (though she would make the perfect Lady of Shallot floating down the river). Anne might not always get it quite right, but she does keep things interesting...

Through Anne's eyes, the ordinary world becomes magical and every day is an adventure. She inspires the dreamer in all of us, never hesitates to say the things we wish we could get away with, and makes us cherish every kindred spirit we meet. It's no surprise Anne is loved around the world by generations of readers.

This new edition lovingly restores the original, unabridged text and includes an all-new, exclusive introduction with special memories from L.M. Montgomery's granddaughter.

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    Chapter 1

    Mrs. Rachel Lynde Is Surprised

    Mrs. Rachel Lynde lived just where the Avonlea main road dipped down into a little hollow, fringed with alders and ladies' eardrops and traversed by a brook that had its source away back in the woods of the old Cuthbert place; it was reputed to be an intricate, headlong brook in its earlier course through those woods, with dark secrets of pool and cascade; but by the time it reached Lynde's Hollow it was a quiet, well-conducted little stream, for not even a brook could run past Mrs. Rachel Lynde's door without due regard for decency and decorum; it probably was conscious that Mrs. Rachel was sitting at her window, keeping a sharp eye on everything that passed, from brooks and children up, and that if she noticed anything odd or out of place she would never rest until she had ferreted out the whys and wherefores thereof.

    There are plenty of people, in Avonlea and out of it, who can attend closely to their neighbor's business by dint of neglecting their own; but Mrs. Rachel Lynde was one of those capable creatures who can manage their own concerns and those of other folks into the bargain. She was a notable housewife; her work was always done and well done; she "ran" the Sewing Circle, helped run the Sunday school, and was the strongest prop of the Church Aid Society and Foreign Missions Auxiliary. Yet with all this Mrs. Rachel found abundant time to sit for hours at her kitchen window, knitting "cotton warp" quilts-she had knitted sixteen of them, as Avonlea housekeepers were wont to tell in awed voices-and keeping a sharp eye on the main road that crossed the hollow and wound up the steep red hill beyond. Since Avonlea occupied a little triangular peninsula jutting out into the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with water on two sides of it, anybody who went out of it or into it had to pass over that hill road and so run the unseen gauntlet of Mrs. Rachel's all-seeing eye.

    She was sitting there one afternoon in early June. The sun was coming in at the window warm and bright; the orchard on the slope below the house was in a bridal flush of pinky-white bloom, hummed over by a myriad of bees. Thomas Lynde-a meek little man whom Avonlea people called "Rachel Lynde's husband"-was sowing his late turnip seed on the hill field beyond the barn; and Matthew Cuthbert ought to have been sowing his on the big red brook field away over by Green Gables. Mrs. Rachel knew that he ought because she had heard him tell Peter Morrison the evening before in William J. Blair's store over at Carmody that he meant to sow his turnip seed the next afternoon. Peter had asked him, of course, for Matthew Cuthbert had never been known to volunteer information about anything in his whole life.

    And yet here was Matthew Cuthbert, at half past three on the afternoon of a busy day, placidly driving over the hollow and up the hill; moreover, he wore a white collar and his best suit of clothes, which was plain proof that he was going out of Avonlea; and he had the buggy and the sorrel mare, which betokened that he was going a considerable distance. Now, where was Matthew Cuthbert going and why was he going there?

    Had it been any other man in Avonlea, Mrs. Rachel, deftly putting this and that together, might have given a pretty good guess as to both questions. But Matthew so rarely went from home that it must be something pressing and unusual which was taking him; he was the shyest man alive and hated to have to go among strangers or to any place where he might have to talk. Matthew, dressed up with a white collar and driving in a buggy, was something that didn't happen often. Mrs. Rachel, ponder as she might, could make...

About the Author-
  • L.M. Montgomery achieved international fame in her lifetime that endures well over a century later. A prolific writer, she published some 500 short stories and poems and twenty novels. Most recognized for Anne of Green Gables, her work has been hailed by Mark Twain, Margaret Atwood, Madeleine L'Engle and Princess Kate, to name a few. Today, Montgomery's novels, journals, letters, short stories, and poems are read and studied by general readers and scholars from around the world. Her writing appeals to people who love beauty and to those who struggle against oppression.
Reviews-
  • DOGO Books redheadperson22 - Warning! This review contains spoilers. I haven't read the book in a few years. It might have not been this particular version, but I've read the book about 3 or 4 times. I really liked it. But there are some things that I really didn't like. For starters, I didn't like the way they portrayed red-heads. I'm a red-head, and I hated the way they made it seem like red-heads were automatically ugly. I also didn't like that Anne thought of her-self as ugly, and no one in the entire book disagreed with her. It wasn't until closer to the end of the book (when her hair was a bit darker and she didn't have as many freckles) that people thought she wasn't as ugly. Other thing I didn't like was that the man (I think his name was Matthew) died. I really liked him, and so did Anne. I don't get why he had to die. I also didn't like the fact that Anne was so obsessed with the way she looked. She even tried to dyed her hair black, but it ended up turning green. I wish she could have just learned to accept herself, instead of always complaining about being ugly. Despite all of it's flaws, overall it was a good book.
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Anne of Green Gables Series, Book 1
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L.M. Montgomery
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